Happy Thanksgiving as ‘The Storm’ football program has plenty for which to give thanks- @HopkinsCentral @evans02_mike @minguabeefjerky @1776Bank @KyHighFootball @kyhighs @PrepSpin @MaxPreps @HLpreps @840WHAS 

Photo Credit: Todd Griffin, YourSportsEdge.com

’26 Athlete has ‘hit the spot’ for the defensive 3rd-level in Morton’s Gap

Silas Gunn is a prospect on whom we have been very high since he was in middle school. We featured him even back then. He has grown a little since the middle school days. He is taller, longer, and thicker. Silas is now 6’1,” 165-pounds and plenty rangy. His speed numbers aren’t where they will soon be, but when that happens, he has the moxie, ball-skills, and athleticism to play this game a long, long time. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

HB Lyon, Scouting Director, KPGFootball

We love Thanksgiving at Kentucky Prep Gridiron. We figure since the semi-state participants are practicing today, there isn’t any reason for us to vacay.

After all, toiling on Thanksgiving in the world of high school football is a signature of championship-level play. There is no doubt our coverage strives for, and meets, championship levels. So, our publishing today only seems appropriate.

You’re working. So, we’re working too.

We have probably before published this on one of the prior Thanksgivings in our online history but the tradition of football, on Thanksgiving, began in 1876. That game pitted Yale and Princeton.

The game was played in Hoboken, New Jersey and Yale beat Princeton, 2-0. Both offensive coordinators were let go immediately following the game. We’re kidding.

The first professional football game to be played on Thanksgiving was played in 1920. An urban legend holds the Chicago Tigers played the Decatur Staleys in Chicago. It was the inaugural season of the league. Just which league we are referencing is not completely clear, even to us.

The first professional football game to be played on Thanksgiving was played in 1920

Friday Night Fletch

The loser was reputedly relegated out of the league at the end of the year. The game was played on November 25, 1920. At the end of the year the Tigers, from Chicago, folded. They must have lost.

Turkey wasn’t on the menu at the first Thanksgiving. Venison, duck, goose, oysters, lobster, eel, and fish were served, alongside pumpkins and cranberries. There wasn’t any pumpkin pie nor cranberry sauce served. In those days, Pilgrims and Natives ate their pumpkins and cranberries like real men and women, not watered down into a “pie or sauce.”

Thanksgiving originated as a way to express gratitude for a bountiful harvest. Both of the original participants, the Pilgrims and the Natives, had a custom for expressing thanks for bountiful harvests so it made good sense they should do it together.

I am pretty sure The Storm is pretty grateful Silas Gunn fell into the program’s lap. Gunn played middle school football and his freshman year of high school in Webster County. We featured Gunn and his import, as an “add” to the roster, in this article here published sometime in August.

We predicted Gunn would find an important role on his new roster and he did. Gunn really displayed a versatile, multi-phase, skill-set at Central.

Gunn threw a TD pass, was the ball club’s fifth leading rusher, and caught a handful of passes. Defensively, Gunn was sixth on the team in tackles (44), while leading the team in PBUs, INTs (4), and IRNYs (86). That is quite a bit of production from one, two-way guy.

Gunn threw a TD pass, was the ball club’s fifth leading rusher, caught a handful of passes, was sixth on the team in tackles (44), while leading the team in PBUs, INTs (4), and IRNYs (86)

Friday Night Fletch

No body who knows, or is familiar with Gunn, is the least bit surprised. Gunn is 6’1″ and weighs a well put together 165-pounds and short-shuttles in a quick, 4.62-seconds. Gunn also sports a 97-inch broad jump.

Now Gunn’s production has taken a considerable step forward from his freshman season to the ’23 campaign. His tackles increased from 19 to 44, his INTs increased from two to four, his offensive production went from insignificant to markedly noticeable.

Gunn has all the tools to be a superstar player at this level

Chris Manning, HFC, Hopkins County Central Storm

Coach Manning told us, “Gunn has all the tools to be a superstar player at this level.” When we asked him whether he had given appropriate thanks for this roster windfall. His answer was delivered with a smile and a wink.

“You bet we have. Would love to find a few more over whom to say some grace. Morton’s Gap is a beautiful place to raise a family.” Well said, Coach.

This is Friday Night Fletch, reporting for KPGFootball, reminding you to PLAY THROUGH THE WHISTLE!

If you enjoyed this article and wish to gain full-access to the site, then subscribe monthly to Kentucky Prep Gridiron by following the prompts! 

© The information contained on this site is the copyrighted intellectual property of KPGFootball. Any unauthorized dissemination of this material without the author’s express written consent is strictly prohibited!

About Fletcher Long 1536 Articles
Two-time winner of Kentucky Press Association awards for excellence in writing and reporting news stories while Managing Editor of the Jackson (KY) Times-Voice

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply